C++ (Qt) and JS (React) Software Developer (GUI and Microcontroller) — Part-time rolling contract

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About ICSPI

Integrated Circuit Scanning Probe Instruments (ICSPI “eye-see-spy”) makes the nGauge — the world’s first atomic force microscope (AFM) on a chip.

AFMs collect 3-d data about the texture of a surface, down to the nanoscale (on the order of DNA). AFMs are normally expensive, bulky pieces of equipment that are complicated to operate. Over the course of nearly 10 years of research and development at the University of Waterloo, with the support of DARPA, ICSPI has integrated all the components of a normal AFM onto a single 1 mm x 1 mm silicon chip.

The nGauge AFM is trusted by scientists and engineers at leading universities, government institutes, and companies from startups to the Fortune 500. The nGauge AFM is used for research and development in industries such as advanced materials, semiconductor devices, life sciences, aerospace and precision machining.

 

About the Job

We are looking for a software developer who has experience with C++ and JavaScript to improve the desktop software that our customers use to control the nGauge AFM.

Total number of hours is estimated to be about 100–150 for the bulk of the project, which we would like to have completed within 1–3 months. On-going maintenance of 10 hours per month afterwards would be required.

We are looking to update the existing desktop software through:

  • Well-defined UI improvements
  • Well-defined microcontroller programming improvements
  • New feature implementation

 

Requirements

  • Experience with C++

    • GUI development with Qt

    • Microcontroller programming experience

  • Experience with JavaScript, in particular with React

  • Experience with AWS

  • Experience with cross-platform (Windows and Mac) desktop application development

  • Experience with git

 

Nice to have

  • Experience developing desktop applications on Linux

  • Familiarity with scientific computing